Fun With Email Scammers

By | June 27, 2016
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Fun With Email Scammers

Before we begin – WARNING – we are not recommending you reply to spam / scam emails. We recommend you delete spam/scam emails. Do not try this at home. TC is crazy and we all know it.

I received (and constantly receive) one of those scam emails designed to pluck at my heart strings and make me all warm and fuzzy. When it makes me warm and fuzzy, the intent of such an email is to cause me to abandon my common sense so that I’d actually give my bank account details to someone I don’t know.

Most of the time, I just delete them, but sometimes I can’t resist replying because it’s fun! (Again, please don’t do this at home, ok?)

Here is the scam email I received last year, and my reply to it:

Cloudeight InfoAve

Cloudeight InfoAve

Cloudeight InfoAve

Cloudeight InfoAve

Both the scam letter and the response are not text, but images – just in case you thought your eyes were playing tricks on you.

11 thoughts on “Fun With Email Scammers

  1. Judy

    Has anyone on the internet not fail pray to these people. And do they EVER give up, I think not. But I am not as brave as you TC, because I DO NOT ever want to hear from them again. I don’t get many any more, my internet service does a tremendous job culling out the scammers and spammers. But I’ll have to admit, I liked your reply and always wanted to do that. LOL As always TC, we enjoy your humor, and thanks for kicking her butt for us. LOL

    Reply
  2. Janice Gower

    Love your reply. Assume you did not actually send it, but if you did, even better. It must work or wouldn’t they all give up?

    Reply
  3. Tim

    That is the best yet,,,, I think everyone would love sending that to them. just think if one million of us sent that
    to the same one he or she would never send e-mail again…

    Reply
  4. Bob Palmer

    I am yet again amused by your treatment of this obvious attempt to “con” you but, at the risk of being seen as pedantic, I would suggest that you research the difference between “disperse” and “disburse”.

    Reply
    1. infoave Post author

      That was a quick email actually sent to the scammer. I took a screen shot of it – it’s not the actual email. I was certainly not going back and correcting a goofy email sent in jest and then taking another screen shot. I think everyone, got the idea.

      There is a difference between “pedantic” and “picayune” too :). But hey, they both begin with “P”!

      TC

      Reply
  5. Barb

    I’m just wondering if Sayuri Yoshiko ever wrote back after your reply. Ha

    Reply
  6. Melody

    I thoroughly enjoyed your response to this scammer! I receive a ton of these emails in my seldom used hotmail account. Most of the time I do delete them…..but if I have been having a bad day, I like to take the opportunity to blow off steam and the scammers are a perfect target. I feel within my rights to do this. They are criminals and deserve everything negative for their efforts.

    Reply
  7. Mike

    I loved this reply.
    It is almost like what I did to one of the Computer Virus Scammers that call you on the phone saying that their servers have detected that you have a virus and you need to have their tech to access your computer over TeamViewer to help access the extent of the infection, to which they take you to the event viewer log files of Windows and show you all of the data it gathers when a program fails for whatever reason, and not a real infection, but they use that info to scare the unwary person on the phone to think they have a major infection, then tell them that it will cost between $99 to $250 for them to remotely go in and repair the damage. Give me a break, I wouldn’t trust my closest friend to remotely go into my computer to do something simple, let alone what they are suggesting. Anyway back to my story.

    I got a call from one of these scammers and they gave the whole song and dance of that they detected that my computer was infected ( which I know for a fact it isn’t.) When the person on the phone was finished with their whole line of crap, and asked me what I wanted to do. I got creative. I said: Really our computer is infected, let me talk to my supervisor to see what they want to do. Then waited about one minute, then got back on the phone and said that we wanted to have it fixed. He gave me his whole thing on how to install TeamViewer and all and to give him the code on the computer from the TeamViewer, and his supposed name so that I will know it is him when he access the computer. But the fun part came when he asked me for my info and who I was. This is when I informed him that I was Lieutenant ( Insert Fake Name Here) from the Acworth Police Department, and our Cyber fraud specialist is tracing this call back to its source for the purpose of warrants and subpoena’s to be served. I never heard someone hang up the phone so fast in my life. My brother was next to me during the whole call, when it was over. We couldn’t help but bust a gut laughing. So far to this date I haven’t received another one of those calls at all, and that happened over a year ago.

    Reply

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