Go Hack Yourself… Or How to Recover Lost Email Passwords

By | October 29, 2016
Print pagePDF page

Go Hack Yourself… Or How to Recover Lost Email Passwords

We’ve been installing a lot of Thunderbird Email programs and we’ve noticed that a few people don’t know their email passwords. Luckily, in most cases, we can recover them, and today we’re going to let you in on a little trick we use.

There are a lot of “ifs” involving recovery passwords for email. It depends on what email program you use – or if you don’t use an email program, but use a browser to access you email.

If you use an email program to access your email, then you’ll find Mail Pass View from Nirsoft very helpful. Keep in mind this may be considered a “hacking tool” by some antivirus and security programs. But since the one you’re actually hacking is yourself – it’s all good.

Here’s the author’s description of Mail Pass View

Mail PassView is a small password-recovery tool that reveals the passwords and other account details for the following email clients:

Outlook Express

Microsoft Outlook 2000 (POP3 and SMTP Accounts only)

Microsoft Outlook 2002/2003/2007/2010/2013/2016 (POP3, IMAP, HTTP and SMTP Accounts)

Windows Mail

Windows Live Mail

IncrediMail

Eudora

Mozilla Thunderbird (If the password is not encrypted with master password)

For each email account, the following fields are displayed: Account Name, Application, Email, Server, Server Type (POP3/IMAP/SMTP), User Name, and the Password…

Mail Pass View is free and it comes from one of our most trusted software developers, Nirsoft. For more information and/or to download Mail Pass View visit this page.

If you do all your email from within your Web browser (Outlook.com, Yahoo.com, Gmail.com) you might find WebBrowserPassView useful. You can get more info and or download WebBrowserPassView here .

Additionally, most Web mail like Gmail, Outlook, Yahoo, have a password recovery link on the page where you sign in. You can use that link to re-set your password for any Web mail account.

A reminder. Your security software may go nuts when you try to run either of the above programs;  they can be considered hacking tools. But they’re made for you to use on your own computer – and not for anyone to hack someone else’s PC.

As long as you use them as intended, they’re great programs and pose no danger to your PC.

11 thoughts on “Go Hack Yourself… Or How to Recover Lost Email Passwords

  1. Brian

    Nirsoft is awesome! I have used Mail Pass View and it saved me a lot of pain and anguish. Best of all, their programs are freeware. They have a great variety of useful utilities, BUT your right….anti malware protection goes berzerk after download. I just opted to chose “ignore ” in the scan selection of my anti virus/malware program, so it doesn’t keep tripping a “red alert” so-to-speak, in future scans. Nirsoft programs ARE virus free, so no worries there. I can’t say enough for Nirsoft utilities. Your article is most helpful and is truly a GREAT resource. Thanks for sharing!

    Reply
  2. LB

    I was not able to download either the zip version or the other version of this program. Norton said it was unsafe and removed it. Can you tell me how to get Norton to accept it this one time?

    Reply
    1. infoave Post author

      We don’t use or recommend Norton, so sorry we can’t help you. You might want to check with Norton’s support.

      Reply
    2. Brian

      @LB…I had the same issue with my antivirus/malware program. What I had to do was pause/stop the program completely and download the Nirsoft file. Once it was down, I fired the Antivirus/malware back up and ran a system scan. It did trip on the downloaded file, but I just selected “ignore” and let the scan continue. For the very brief period of no firewall/antivirus-malware protection, no other “nasties” accessed my system. Multiple scans, using my main protection and another program I use to detect rootkits, trojans and the likes proved negative. You will need to go into your Norton scan settings and select the Nirsoft download to be excluded in future scans. If you don’t you will be faced with ongoing alerts. Nirsoft are a legitimate company and have been in business for years. They didn’t get to be where they are by providing software that has hidden and nefarious capabilities. They are completely upfront about their product and warn about Anti malware tripping an alert. I love their collection of utilities. I will use them as long as they exist. Hope this helps.

      Reply
  3. Sharon

    what is to stop others from using this program to access your passwords???

    Reply
    1. infoave Post author

      I would certainly hope you would! Someone would have to have physical access to your computer to install a program on it…or be tricked into it…no one here is trying to trick you.

      Reply
    2. Brian

      Info Ave is spot on! There are no tricks here. Just great advice on a utility that is very handy and helpful. (If you truly are in doubt, pass on the opportunity). Presumably, you are referring to someone using the program on your own computer/network. You can setup a guest user account which does not allow access to this specific program. If they can’t access it, they can’t see your passwords unless you provide them! As a second layer of security you can use the properties settings for the program and edit the permissions so that only YOU are allowed access and anyone else is denied. ( I will leave this to Info Ave, to do an article on ) They will have to have a reasonably and well above average knowledge of bypassing system settings to get to the program and getting it to run for them. Alternatively, they would have to use some specialized software, either installing it on your system or use a flash drive to boot into the software and thus use it to expose your sensitive data. I don’t know about you, but I wouldn’t let allow ANYONE to install or use a flash drive/disk drive to do anything, before I was certain of what that specific media contained. As far as accessing the program from outside your network…that’s where your firewall come into play. If you place a password to protect access to your firewall, ensure you use a very lengthy combination of upper/lower case letters, numbers and symbols. Write the password down and keep it in a safe place away from your computer. The longer the password the better. I read an article where a University Graduate Student used a 99 alpha/numeric password for logon to her computer. Her friends chided her for it….but guess what? Her computer was NEVER breached. Even a “Brute Force” program/attack would literally take years to solve the password. I’m not suggesting you use 99 characters….but 15 characters is a pretty safe number. As a closing thought….if you’re worried about someone changing system settings or trying to mess with your computer, consider investing in a program called DEEP FREEZE! ( I’m not a shill for this company. I use the program and it does what it says, and does it VERY well.) It prevents that kind of thing happening, either from a physical attempt or by some rogue trojan that attempts to mess you up. They do occasionally get through). Hope this helps a bit. Cheers!

      Reply
  4. patrick

    @LB: Norton displays a popup in the bottom right-hand corner of your display when it senses a prog that is not kosher. It usually displays “see details’.. Click on the popup and click on restore prog.

    You can also go to Security, Settings, Firewall, Program Control and allow or block any programs.

    Great security suite, have used it for years and has never let me down, and my computer is squeaky clean. All the Norton haters out there don’t know how to use it or have some other agenda.

    Reply
  5. JOYCE CLARK

    I have Google Chrome for my email, that isn’t mentioned in the types of emails this Go Hack Yourself programs work with. Would this work on Google Chrome?

    Reply
  6. Brian

    @Joyce Clark…
    Here’s what Nirsoft say about Mail Pass View:
    Mail PassView is a small password-recovery tool that reveals the passwords and other account details for the following email clients:

    Outlook Express
    Microsoft Outlook 2000 (POP3 and SMTP Accounts only)
    Microsoft Outlook 2002/2003/2007/2010/2013/2016 (POP3, IMAP, HTTP and SMTP Accounts)
    Windows Mail
    Windows Live Mail
    IncrediMail
    Eudora
    Netscape 6.x/7.x (If the password is not encrypted with master password)
    Mozilla Thunderbird (If the password is not encrypted with master password)
    Group Mail Free
    Yahoo! Mail – If the password is saved in Yahoo! Messenger application.
    Hotmail/MSN mail – If the password is saved in MSN/Windows/Live Messenger application.
    Gmail – If the password is saved by Gmail Notifier application, Google Desktop, or by Google Talk.
    For each email account, the following fields are displayed: Account Name, Application, Email, Server, Server Type (POP3/IMAP/SMTP), User Name, and the Password. ”

    Chrome make a desktop and Browser but I don’t think there is a “Chrome email client” per se. Chrome is a Google product and their email clients are Gmail and Google mail (I stand to be corrected on this). Having said that, if you have passwords saved in your browser (Chrome I assume) you can use their browser utility utility to recover stored passwords…but as the quot from Nirsoft indicates, if you use gmail and have your password stored/saved by Gmail notifier, then yes it will recover it. I hope this helps.

    Reply
  7. Brian

    @ Patrick… I suggest your closing statement is a huge stretch; bull shizzle to be exact. To suggest that “All the Norton haters out there don’t know how to use it or have some other agenda.” is utter nonsense. To carpet bag those that have no use for Norton by indicating “all” Norton Haters, is complete fallacy. I used Norton for several years and abandoned it when it became resource heavy and bloated! There are legitimate, and arms length study results that show there are many free and paid for antimalware/virus ware programs that blow it out of the water. Glad your impressed with it! But please, if your going to shill for Norton (Symantec) don’t do so at the risk of offering unsubstantiated and meaningless insult at those that do have a legitimate criticism of the program YOU happen to use.

    Reply

Leave a Reply to Brian Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *