Windows 10 Version Updates and a Poll

By | October 10, 2018
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Windows 10 Version Updates and a Poll

Another version update and another major problem. Windows 10 October 2018 Update (Version 1809) was released October 2, 2018 and then was pulled on October 5 when Microsoft discovered during the update some user’s personal files were deleted. Once Microsoft verified this, they yanked the update — and as of today (October 10) the upgrade is still not available.

How many botched version updates will it take before Microsoft takes whatever steps necessary so Windows 10 users don’t have to hold their collective breaths whenever a Windows 10 version update rolls around. It’s seems inconceivable to us that Microsoft,with all its reasources and reach, can’t seem to get it right. And why do we need two version updates a year? What’s wrong with one update a year – an update that isn’t released until it’s done right.

We’re not bashing Microsoft. They’ve done some great things, not the least of which is put the personal computer within the reach of almost everyone. There are over a billion Windows users. And while Windows is no longer the most popular operating system in the world (Android is) it’s still the number one operating system for personal computers.

But just because Microsoft has done some great things, does not meant they don’t need to improve. In the last year we’ve all seen that they have a lot of work to do. We’ve seen two botched version updates this year. The April 2018 Update which was delayed almost a whole month after it was found to be flawed. In fact, Microsoft delayed it so long that the April 2018 Update almost became the May 2018 update.

And last week, Microsoft, rushed out the Windows 10 October 2018 update, only to discover that a substantial number of early adopters had their personal files zapped by the updat. Microsoft quickly pulled the update, but pulling the update didn’t help those who were affected.

What we’ve learned from the last two Windows 10 update debacles is this. We are going to take a cautious approach to Windows 10 version updates from now on. We’re going to recommend that Windows 10 users wait for a month or so after a version update before allowing the update to install or installing it using the Windows 10 Upgrade assistant.

This is happening far too often; this kind of thing should be the rare exception and not be the expected. It’s not good for Windows 10 users and its certainly not good for Microsoft.

Of course, we know that nothing we say here will sway the powers that be at Microsoft, but we think releasing one, good Windows 10 version update would be in everyone’s best interest – including Microsoft’s. One version update per year would give Microsoft extra time to test new features and to make sure the update that is released to the public isn’t going to brick people’s computers or erase their data.

Windows 10 users should not continually have to worry that every time a new version of Windows 10 is released it’s going to erase data, brick their computer or cause a myriad of problems.

At one time Microsoft released a new version of Windows about every 2 to 4 years (Windows 95, Windows 98, Windows ME, Windows XP, etc.). Now they’re releasing new versions of Windows 10 twice each year. Maybe it’s time Microsoft slowed down the pace of new releases and focus on releasing one exceptionally good updated version each year.

That’s our take on things, but…

What do you think? Take our poll and tell us what you think!

10 thoughts on “Windows 10 Version Updates and a Poll

  1. Karl

    Once upon a time we were concerned about losing personal files and data due to mechanical or electronic malfunctions. Later we became concerned with losses due to encryption and ransomware, now we can add Microsoft to the may ways our precious files and data can be lost. The solution has always been and still is…backup, backup and backup. Get a good program that makes it easy to do and just DO IT!

    Reply
  2. Yvonne

    Heck! I am still using Windows 7 and hold my breath and hate any notifications of “updates.”
    Updates have ALWAYS been a pain in the neck!

    Reply
    1. Marinus Pieck

      Goodness me, still using Windows 7, now at least 11 years old. Definitely no comparison with Windows 10, which is far more superior. I did download the latest update (v. 1810) without any hitches. I also prefer two large updates a year. I also like the idea that the operating system, Windows 10, remains as is, without actually changing to another operating system, but is being further improved and enhanced whenever a large update is introduced. I also consider Windows 10 far more user friendly!

      Reply
  3. Betsy

    What do you do if you already have the update on your computer?? I cannot see any problem with it..Should I get rid of it or leave it?

    Reply
  4. Rose Cantalini

    Last night when I turned off my computer , Win 10 update began and said ” do not turn off your computer”. I was stuck.
    When I turned it on today it began to install the update. It stalled at the 93% completed time. After a while it said 94% and then said that it could not continue and began undoing what it had completed. I was relieved. This whole operation took about 20 minutes if not longer. Has it been made known what the update involves and what it
    will do to improve our computers? Could some of us not want it ? Updates scare me.

    Reply
  5. Fay Korcykoski

    I tried to set windows update to update security updates only , however that didn’t either. It still changes my settings and adds a lot of STUFF I do not want. It is never improved, I end up messing up my computer trying to get it to the point that I can use it again! So far I haven’t found a way to shut down the computer without getting the update, It seems to me that it is more than twice a year. how can I refuse it, they are holding us hostage!!

    Reply
  6. D.

    I would say these people who make programs and etc. are not happy about two version updates coming out a year either. It is like common sense has left from the top level at Microsoft and they should be called out on that. I don’t know what has happened to Microsoft. I have said that before. I would think this twice a year update is interesting for everybody…Microsoft, programmers and the public. It would be interesting to see who it was supposed to benefit to begin with, I think, two updates a year. I don’t think it was the public in my opinion.

    One version update a year or so is plenty enough. I don’t think you would get a lot of argument against that either. We used to do that šŸ™‚

    Reply
  7. D.

    I think this is a good read talking about this patching today. I hope you read this. This is a bit of what is on that page.

    “My biggest paranoia about patching today is that all of this paranoia about patching is no longer irrational paranoia over immaterial corner cases that the vast majority of people would never hit. My biggest paranoia is that more and more people will stop updating because of the reality that we are seeing.

    Iā€™m also paranoid that folks in the insider program will overstate the severity of their bugs to the point that adding a severity rating to every bug will make no difference and once again we will have bugs that get lost in the firehose of feedback and upvoting.

    Microsoft needs to take a severe action like moving feature release cadence to once a year to showcase that they too want to stop the paranoia over patching and make us feel comfortable again.

    I remember when we had horrible patch quality. I remember when we had patches released without a solid release schedule. I remember when patches were pulled back, had to be redone. And I feel paranoid that we are back to where we started 15 years ago.”

    https://www.askwoody.com/2018/patch-lady-31-days-of-paranoia-day-10/

    Reply

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